What Determines Morality?

Without truth, our approach to morality is forever subject to the whim of human desire.

Todd Beal

The key to understanding morality is determining what is right, first, so that by default we equally know what is wrong. When Jesus’ truth resides within our heart, and if we also then abide in his truth, we won’t try to do right by not doing wrong, but instead simply fight to do right and thereby avoid willful wrongdoing. This goes hand in hand with fighting against religious legalism, which always involves morality. We cannot appease truth by telling ourselves, “Do this; do that; don’t do this; don’t do that”, regardless of the superficial benefits to our self and society. Truth says, “Submit yourself to me – completely – and I will empower you to do all things according to my right ways, not yours.”

The essence of sexual morality hinges on the very meaning of marriage, and marriage, truth. Truth is the unifying factor in marriage and he created the human version of marriage to unify our two opposite genders, not to break down two persons of the same gender who try to sexually unite. In human terms then, marriage is not temporary but is the lifetime union between a man and a woman, for once any two beings are truly unified, both will irreparably break if something ever divides them; they are literally and irrevocably in and through each other, becoming each other, forever.

Therefore, if truth – the unifying factor in marriage – resides within our heart and we abide also in that truth, we will not willfully lust after someone who is not our spouse; we will not purport that same gender sex is okay, let alone which age makes it okay; we will not cry foul when our gay rights are denied; and we will not argue for legal freedom to practice bestiality, objectophilia, pedophilia, or any other morally questionable activity.

Truth is what it is, and by its very existence reveals what it is not. Truth is morality, and all it is not within is hopelessly immoral, including our desires. If Living Truth does not reside within your heart, or does but you choose to ignore its sovereignty, and if then you assign moral status to any religion, activity, desire, or behavior, your motive for doing so has nothing to do with truth, only self-indulgence, even if for reasons of “righteous” asceticism and austerity. Truth alone empowers moral assignment, but if Truth is missing from your heart you will not know it; you will carry on assigning and un-assigning, believing that you alone are purveyor of the very truth you so adamantly reject.

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About Todd Beal

I love truth and its facts. I love thought-provoking conversations that give both the other person and me a better understanding of a particular topic. I love to find answers to life-long questions; answers that let me see things for what they are instead of what they seem to be. I truly enjoy being in the midst of a group of people where all individuals are joining in, where everybody is enjoying the company of each other. I relax in the company of individuals who are competent yet humble. I like to catch myself doing or saying something ridiculous and then laugh my head off. I enjoy my church and being involved.
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34 Responses to What Determines Morality?

  1. Jerry Hill says:

    The making of true disciples of Jesus has been hindered by the organized church insisting there is a scriptural, universal and absolute morality which applies to every Christian at all times and in every situation.
    It became easier for me to follow the promptings of the Spirit of Jesus during my individual experiences, unhindered by “traditions of men,” once I understood that even the Apostle Paul wrote his epistles to the church as a Recovering Pharisee This was the very essence of Paul’s personal, progressive sanctification and can be glimpsed when his epistles are considered chronologically. The fact is believers of every era progressed spiritually but never to the point of perfection during their lifetimes; and those who penned scripture were not exceptions. Unless a believer relies upon The Spirit of Truth for personal guidance, the fashionable “morality” of the time becomes a tool of satan!

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Jerry,

      | The making of true disciples of Jesus has been hindered by the organized church insisting there is a scriptural, universal and absolute morality which applies to every Christian at all times and in every situation. |

      Absolute morality does exist; otherwise there would be no such thing as morality. However, there also exists a personal morality that is unique to each individual. Absolute morality is the essence of righteous living. Personal morality, as Paul laid out in I Corinthians 10:23-31, is based on God’s unique design for each separate person. It allows each of us to live our life according to our unique personal design, not according to some other person’s unique design. Paul’s phrase for personal morality is “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling”. In no way does personal morality contradict absolute morality, just as no contradiction exists between God as a single being and God also being three separate unified personages: God the Father, God the Son (Jesus Christ), and God the Holy Spirit. There also exists no contradiction between love and a person’s unique ability and capacity to give and receive love. Love is love, but the way it manifests varies according to the unique design of the individual. Real love is selfless but we each give and receive it according to our unique personality. Likewise, absolute morality is what it is, but it uniquely manifests according to the individual within whom it develops.

      I sense that the issue you are specifically addressing is religious legalism, which I also addressed in this post. Religious legalism is akin to Pharisee-ism. It makes a whole list of dos and don’ts without taking the individual into account. Essentially, religious legalism sets aside a personal relationship with Jesus Christ in favor of authoritarian religious rule. This is not absolute morality. It is the attempt to reconstruct absolute morality by adhering to a “letter of the law” code, but doing so outside the Spirit of the Law. This is the very thing that drove Jesus to rebuke the Pharisees. Religious legalism is not absolute morality; it is a God-devoid attempt to appease God with our fallen human reasoning.

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  2. Good points, Todd, and there will be plenty who disagree with you, so this is a courageous post. This world we are moving in is such a morass of relativism that many will feel justified in being offended at your audacity to suggest that a universal, unified truth exists at all, and that we are all eventually subject to it. “How dare you try to inflict ‘your truth’ upon me!” is the cry, as if there is somehow a ‘menu’ of truths to choose from according to what fits each preference or conscience. Thanks for your efforts to get at the bedrock beneath the straw huts of human philosophies, the veracity that underlies and pre-exists our busy, selfish, and under-informed minds. That foundation is not visible except through the eyes of faith, and those who try to get at it with science or reason alone will continually come up short.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Michael,

      People reject others’ presentation of truth because they instinctively understand that human wisdom is not truth, including their own, but at the same time they push their human wisdom on others and speak of it as if it is truth. And yet, a person will not accept truth while their heart rebels against it: just as you said, “That foundation is not visible except through the eyes of faith, and those who try to get at it with science or reason alone will continually come up short.” It is for this reason, I now present truth according to my ability and let the chips fall where they may. The rest is between the other person and God.

      I have a long way to go in my understanding of truth and in improving my ability to present it as well, and I will continue until either the ability leaves me or God takes me home. I love truth and I love the fact that God makes it available to all who love him.

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  3. Jerry Hill says:

    I forgot to mention that I agree with most of your post; but I tripped over the cookie-cutter definition of marriage espoused by our present-day Christian tradition. Here Paul’s verse which says the letter of the law kills but the Spirit of the Law gives life came to my mind. For I know many sincere and earnest believers who have been marginalized, ostracized and even shunned in the church because their marriage-for-life failed. And I have witnessed them sincerely seeking to follow the Spirit of Truth in all their subsequent dealings with the opposite sex, receiving nothing but criticism and condemnation from their unwittingly self-righteous brethren.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Jerry,

      | I forgot to mention that I agree with most of your post; but I tripped over the cookie-cutter definition of marriage espoused by our present-day Christian tradition. |

      This is a very controversial issue and I don’t profess to have all the answers, but the Bible clearly says divorce and also a subsequent remarriage is not an option except in two scenarios: (1) Adultery (Matthew 19) (2) A believer’s unbelieving spouse refuses to remain in the marriage (I Corinthians 7). I believe that if both individuals within a marriage have truly submitted their whole self to God – completely – God’s powerful love will be at the very center of their marriage; otherwise, a lackluster relationship exists at best, and divorce is imminent at worst. I believe that if a man and a woman both seek God with their whole heart, regardless of compatibility issues, God will grow their bond and transform their differences from mutually detrimental into mutually beneficial for them both.

      | I know many sincere and earnest believers who have been marginalized, ostracized and even shunned in the church because their marriage-for-life failed. And I have witnessed them sincerely seeking to follow the Spirit of Truth in all their subsequent dealings with the opposite sex, receiving nothing but criticism and condemnation from their unwittingly self-righteous brethren. |

      It is one thing for someone’s marriage to fail, but is quite another for a Christian to remarry for reasons other than adultery or rejection by an unbelieving spouse. However, I realize that within every area of life gray areas exist, including in marriage. In those unique scenarios I choose not to judge someone, except when his/her decision is based on human wisdom instead of the Holy Spirit’s guidance.

      Providing one divorces for scriptural reasons, there is no room for someone else to point the finger of blame. Critical self-righteous attitudes split churches and drive weak Christians away from God. But if one divorces for non-scriptural reasons (again, I know there are gray areas), that person is in danger of receiving God’s judgment, let alone the judgment of fellow believers. But in all cases we must remember to build up our fellow believers as Paul repeatedly admonitions throughout his letters, not tear them down and drive them away from God. It is so very important to extend to others the very love God extends to us.

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      • Lance Ponder says:

        Todd, this is not a critique of anything you or Jerry have said, but the discussion has made me introspective… My first marriage ended badly. I left the marriage “biblically justified.” Looking back on it, when I drop the denial and expose my heart to the light, what I find is that we were both guilty and neither of us were innocent in the collapse of that relationship. In fact, as the man I am responsible for my household. I turned my back on that responsibility and when my back was turned she did what she felt she had to do. I blamed her, but ultimately I am responsible for her sin. Her sin becomes my own and I must own it, then confess it, then seek forgiveness. While that relationship will never be healed and restored fully, the wounds can be healed and a right relationship with Jesus can be restored when truth is accepted and confessed and repentance is completed.

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        • Todd Beal says:

          Lance,

          Thanks a lot for bringing this up. I know it is not easy to publicly share something like this. Only someone who loves truth will testify to the truth as you did. It takes an authentic man to claim his undesirable past, and this is just one more reason for me to respect you more than I already do.

          Your scenario is a real example of what I have been warning against for several years; overlooking the unseen reasons behind divorce. I have heard the adultery finger pointing scenario my whole life, both in religious and non-religious circles alike. The one who overtly engaged/engages in the adulterous affair almost always receives the harshest criticism from others. When someone tries to convince me to side with his/her “righteous” judgment against an adulterous offender, I immediately say, “Okay, sin is never justified for any reason, including adultery, but what exactly did the “victim” spouse do, or neglect to do, to encourage the affair (affair being either physical or strictly inside the heart and mind)? Did the “victim” spouse prioritize career over deep marital intimacy? Was the “victim” spouse grossly stingy, refusing to give much needed physical and verbal affection prior to the affair? Did he or she habitually toss around hurtful and calloused remarks that felt degrading and demeaning to the once-committed spouse?” Of course, their answer to my question is almost always the same: “None of that really matters. The fact remains; that person cheated.”

          Once again, I am certainly not condoning adultery for any reason, but I agree with you Lance; sometimes scripture-justified divorce is not always justified in God’s eyes. Sometimes the “victim” spouse is as much the cheater as the overtly cheating spouse. When we rob our spouse of intimate access to our heart, mind, soul, and body, we are the cause of divorce – we cheat first – not the other way around. When we give our spouse less love than what we give to our self, our children, or anything else, we are the one having the affair – we are the one with the adulterous heart.  And come to think of it, this may have been what Jesus was referring to in Matthew 19:8 [NASB]; “Because of your hardness of heart Moses permitted you to divorce your wives; but from the beginning it has not been this way.”

          Scripture-justified reasons for divorce truly exist, but equally, not every divorce that appears justified is justified before God. This is why religious legalism never works. It rigidly focuses on the overt, never the heart – a useless formula. It mandates judgment based on the prosecutor’s punitive intent, not Godly discernment. It takes two people to build a strong relationship and only one to break it down. Yet always, the breakdown first begins in the heart, the heart of the one who refuses to freely give love to the other spouse.

          Lance, my intent is not to throw stones or to rub salt in your wound, but to thankfully use your real scenario as a caution sign for all married couples.

          One last thing; the reality of leadership came to mind when I read your statement, “…as the man I am responsible for my household”. A leader is always held to a greater responsibility than those whom he leads. Yes, it takes two people to build a strong marriage, but only one has God’s authority, and charge, to lead. That responsibility and honor belongs to the husband. “For the husband is the head of the wife, as Christ also is the head of the church, He Himself being the Savior of the body.” – Ephesians 5:23 [NASB]

          Lance thanks for this. You are truly my Christian brother.

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  4. Todd,

    I think you’re on the right track when it comes to laying off on judgment against those who choose to divorce. On the one hand, I’ve seen people divorce over what I’d consider to be very minor differences, going through 4-6 spouses like changing shoes. On the other hand, I’ve seen marriages survive situations we would consider to be scriptural justifications for divorce. Adultery is a very serious matter, but it is a forgivable offense, and with repentance, contrition, and hard work on the part of both spouses, a marriage can survive a single bout with this (I’ve never seen one survive a repeat offense!).

    In every case, the decision to maintain or dissolve a marriage rests with the individuals and with God, should they choose to involve Him. It’s easy for us to look at the lady down the street who has had 4 husbands and assume that there is “an issue” with HER (Jesus let one such Samaritan woman know that despite her “issues”, his living water was still available to her). We don’t know what may have happened to her as a child that resulted in her being attracted to the wrong type of man, or what other influences beyond her own choices caused these situations. I admire the counselors, bishops, and other servants who work hard and prayerfully to preserve the sacred institution of marriage on a case-by-case basis, but who also have the discernment to know when to agree with a couple that it’s time to dissolve the relationship and allow people to move on.

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    • Jerry Hill says:

      Amen to that.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Michael,

      Regarding the Samaritan woman at the well (John 4:1-42), I am glad you brought this up. I have not thought of it in the way you describe. You are right; we don’t know her history. It is interesting, and sad, that we church/Bible-educated individuals immediately judge that woman in our mind without knowing anything about her. Another interesting point is that unlike many of the other individuals Jesus encountered, he did not afterward say to her, “Go and sin no more.” Why? Notice she did not verbally repent of anything, including her intimate living arrangement with a man to whom she was not married – a most grievous sin against the God-given Jewish Law, a sin punishable by death. Why didn’t Jesus address her adultery as sin? It certainly wasn’t because he condoned it. Scripture says the Samaritan woman simply believed Jesus to be the Christ of whom the prophets spoke and then rushed back to her city to spread the Good News. Notice that prior to this, Jesus focused on telling her the good news about himself being the Living Water, the very Messiah spoken of by the prophets. When we believe in Jesus, we naturally want to stop sinning and start doing right. It is possible that this very inward change developed within her after believing in Jesus. Whether she ultimately verbally repented, scripture doesn’t tell us, but nonetheless, because of her belief and verbal testimony of that belief, many Samaritans from that city believed in Jesus as their Messiah.

      Now contrast this with Jesus’ rebuke of the scribes and Pharisees. They not only knew what the Law and the prophets said concerning all right and wrong, but also developed a twisted religious legal system based on those same Holy Scriptures, exploiting God’s Word for their own personal gain to the detriment of others. Jesus rebuked them in Matthew 23:13-36 and Matthew 12:22-37, calling them whitewashed sepulchers (tombs), a brood of vipers, and even hypocrites because they, of all people, knew better – quite the about-face divergence from his otherwise gracious and forgiving interaction with the woman at the well.

      The preceding contrast parallels my philosophy for dealing with anyone concerning Jesus: deal with an individual at his/her personal and spiritual level. If I am speaking to a clergy member who is rebelliously teaching anti-scripture, I let ‘em have it with the truth of scripture. I have very little patience for either a false prophet or modern-day Pharisee. On the other hand, if I am speaking to either a new or weak Christian, or an open-hearted non-Christian, I attempt to show that person the awesome path to Christ, the path that provides power-filled everlasting life. Jesus lived out this very philosophy every day of his ministry; all the while calling sin, sin, showing why salvation in Him, the Son of God, the provider of everlasting life, is absolutely necessary.

      I take the following lesson from this: Lead people to Jesus – which sometimes includes showing them their sin outright – but in all my ways show them Jesus, not my egocentric legalistic exploitation of scripture for personal gain.

      Michael thanks again for sharing your wisdom.

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  5. Lance Ponder says:

    I heard someone on the radio this morning saying that the purpose of congress is not to create law, but to discover law and codify it. Sooner or later these people should work themselves out of a job if that’s really true. I think most of the last two centuries has been busy work.

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  6. Todd,

    I came across this quote:

    “For [God] sends to the hearts of believers the power of the Holy Spirit, which both illumines our minds and also gradually changes our whole will and affections; and the innate corruption in us is so emended, that we begin both to hate evil and to will and follow the good, which is prescribed in His law.” (Theodore Beza, 1519-1605)

    Strange as it may seem, this was written by Calvin’s hand chosen successor in Geneva. Beza knew however that the old man or nature could not be completely removed in this life. And while all our faculties are involved in Christian faith and knowledge, it always remains a gift of grace! And so we Christians ebb and flow in the Christian life, but hopefully by God’s grace & glory “in us”, we come to some place of firm Christian growth and discipleship. But there is simply no perfection here, or certainly “in us.” But the law of God is always somewhat our tutor, but only ‘In Christ’ does it give us freedom, i.e. in the Law of Christ to love (Rom. 13:8). Btw, the function of the Jewish ceremonial law has ended for us Christians.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Fr. Robert,

      Thanks for this: and a thorough reading of all Biblical scripture yields the same conclusion. Paul also lays out this very truth in Romans 7. But, he does so with hope in verse 25 [NASB]: “Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin.” We can be truly victorious over our fallen desires through Christ alone: Romans 8:12-13 [NASB] “So then, brethren, we are under obligation, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh – for if you are living according to the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you are putting to death the deeds of the body, you will live.”

      | Btw, the function of the Jewish ceremonial law has ended for us Christians. |

      The ceremonial law has ended for us Christians. But, Jesus said he did not come to do away with the Law but to fulfill the Law. He is the living embodiment (the fullness) of the Jewish Law. Jesus is the Living Law – the Law that always was and forever will be. He is written on our hearts, compelling us, moving us to live through him, the living author of the original written code. He is our ability to live up to his standards of holiness, but only if he lives within our heart.

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      • Indeed Christ is the embodiment and perfection of the moral law of God! Also He is the Wisdom Incarnate-enfleshed of God! The Logos-Word of God became flesh! The two are not really different. But we Christians only have this righteousness in any perfection, “In Christ”.. it is a forensic righteousness, the righteouness of Another! (1 John. 2:1) This is the Reformation & Reformed Gospel! But this is also the “Catholic” truth itself! And so the biblical Christian is historically both a “catholic” and “reformed” Christian! Amen.

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        • Todd Beal says:

          Fr. Robert,

          | And so the biblical Christian is historically both a “catholic” and “reformed” Christian! Amen. |

          What do you mean by “catholic”? What do you mean by “reformed”?

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          • Todd,

            Any Gospel we have now came historically from out of the Reformation itself, i.e. Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Bullinger, etc. The list of the Reformers is rather long. The true Church is a historical Church, and Apostolic Church, a Church of the ‘Apostles Doctrine’ (Acts 2:42). And the Reformation was just that.. a “reforming” of the already Church Catholic (universal) of God! I am a historic “Churchman”..as a Anglican. Check out the Irish Articles of 1615, written for the most part by the Archbishop James Ussher, one of my favorite Churchmen, btw. But this historic Church and the Body of Christ is being hammered by many apostate people now, even so-called pastors & teachers who sit in the visible church of God. The Church is now a Body of Wheat & Tares! This is part of the Covenant doctrine and truth of God. The Church has always really been a mixed body, and the “elect” are known only to God! Note, Matt. 22:14..”For many are called, but few are chosen.” Only those who are chosen will be present at the marriage supper of the Lamb! And this election is not based on any status, save being ‘In Christ’.

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          • And btw, the true Church is an election of grace, nothing more and certainly nothing less! (Rom. 11:5, etc.) The Doctrines of Grace adhere this spiritual, but also visible Church! But the real Body of Christ are the election or chosen people of God, but known only to God! We can know ourselves in Him, by His grace, and even some others.. but the essence of the Church and the Election of Grace are again known fully and totally alone by Him!

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            • Todd Beal says:

              Fr. Robert,

              This is one of those doctrinal areas for which I have yet to find a solid entry point, as you and I have discussed previously on your blog. For some strange reason my mind shorts out when I try to study election. I am certainly open to hearing your arguments, just as you mentored me on “eternal security” versus “the ability to lose one’s salvation”.

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  7. Todd,

    The Doctrine of Divine Election is certainly strong meat in the Word of God! And it is certainly a biblical doctrine, but also it is a Pauline doctrine foremost, though the subject is really shot-thru the whole of Scripture. I would use a good concordance also in this study. There have been certainly too some fine gifted pastors and teachers on this subject over the Churches long history. But perhaps today there is no finer teacher here than R.C. Sproul! His book Chosen By God is a classic here! I have been myself an Augustinian Christian and also here a Calvinist for well over 20 years. This was the doctrine that really kept me from going to the EO, or Orthodoxy many months ago. Not that I have ever set the doctrine or teaching of Divine Election aside in itself, it is a certain experiential doctrine for me personally also, in faith and biblical revelation. The older Anglican Communion is ripe with many classic Augustinian and Calvinist Christians.

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    • Todd,

      Also btw, there is a really favorite book of mine by Sam Storms called, Chosen for Life: The Case for Divine Election. A sweet and biblical read! And note, that the idea of Eternal Security is part of the Doctrines of Grace, i.e. in the TULIP.. it is the P, for the Perseverance of the believer-saint.

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  8. Lance Ponder says:

    Todd, I haven’t heard from you in a while. I hope everything is okay.

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    • He was the birthday boy Aug. the 15th (the same day as my youngest son, now 15). Happy 40th Birthday Todd!

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      • Todd Beal says:

        Hi Fr. Robert,

        Thank you! Actually, I turned 41 on August 15th. I had a great birthday with my family and ate lots of good food. Happy birthday to your son also!

        Both you and Lance lifted my spirit with your comments. I appreciate you guys.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Hi Lance,

      My eyes (vision) changed again. This is the biggest change in my vision since 2003 and it is taking a lot of work to get used to it. I am a visual thinker and so each time my vision changes in a major way, I have to learn how to effectively think again. I am just beginning to get a handle on it. I apologize to you, Fr. Robert and Michael for such a long absence. Hopefully, I’ll get back in the swing of things before too much longer. I appreciate your concern Lance. It helps to know someone cares enough to ask.

      By the way, I also started a new job. I work at a health and nutrition company called Uckele. Uckele has two plants: one for human products and one for animal products. I work in the animal plant. We make nutrition supplements mostly for thoroughbred horses. It is a very challenging and detail-oriented job – very interesting.

      Thanks again for the inquiry.

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  9. Todd – good to hear from you. I figured you had some changes going on and could use some space for a time. Glad to hear you have interesting new employment, but concerned to hear about your vision. Whatever the Lord has planned for you, we know you’ll make the best of it. In my book, you will always be a visionary despite whatever you can “see” with your eyes.

    I’m also working on making an employment transition, because my current project is in decline and there’s not much I can do about it. I want to stay in management, because I love working with and coaching people in teams, but it’s critical I find the right company and the right boss. Competition is so fierce for jobs these days, and going to interviews and getting rejected can sometimes leave me doubting my own abilities!

    I look forward to seeing your encouraging and enlightening words again here soon.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Hi Michael,

      You are very perceptive. My vision began its change several months ago but made the big change around the middle of July. It is frightening each time this happens because it drastically changes the way I think. I always wonder, “Is this the Big One? Will I still be able to tackle the difficult concepts? Will my thinking ability increase, decrease, expand, contract, or deepen? Will I still be able to think philosophically? Will I still be able to think through and understand difficult, scriptural doctrinal issues? Will I lose my love for diving into scripture?” All these thoughts run through my mind each time my vision makes a change.

      But you know what’s interesting Michael, I gain so much more than what I lose, every time. God is so good! I have noticed a pattern in all these years of changes. I go through a few years of primarily thinking in one vein, or major mindset (allowing me to really understand the mechanics of thinking in a particular way), my vision makes a major change, then I lose my old way of thinking but gain a brand new dimension that incorporates the old mindset. The result is something brand new that not only allows me to understand and think in new ways, but also allows me to understand and think through with a brand new mindset everything that went before. Hopefully that makes sense. In other words, I never truly lose anything with these changes; I simply gain a new way of thinking that becomes a hybrid of the old and the new. However, it is pretty scary each time this happens because I have to teach myself how to do literally everything (even basic tasks) all over again. It takes about a year to fully acclimate myself to each major change. But, once I understand how positively the new change affects me, I can’t help but thank God for giving me this unique life.

      Regarding job interview rejection, that certainly is very stressful and sometimes disheartening. I will say this; I believe that sometimes it is good to constantly experience rejection so that we earnestly seek, and find, what is truly good for us. Otherwise, we tend to settle for second best because it is more comfortable that way. But it sure isn’t easy while going through those times. These types of experiences help us develop an authentic and rich prayer life if we remain humble. Our life is so much better when we are doing what God wants us to do – something that only a close relationship with him allows. When it comes to changing jobs or career path, I find that our talents never go away; life just changes the areas to which we apply them, including “working with and coaching people in teams”.

      I will be ready to post some new material in a week or two. I have been working through some thoughts that will hopefully soon resolve. Thanks for the encouragement Michael. Just like your very first comment on Truth Behind Reality, your words here were very timely. Thank you very much. I will pray that God gives you direction in your job search.

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      • Wisdom, rather than just “knowledge”! (1 Cor.8:1-3) The good Christian simply must have it! And yet wisdom seems to come close, very close to the Cross, and the Christ of the Cross! ‘ “Buy the truth, and do not sell it, Also wisdom and instruction and understanding.” (Prov. 23: 23 NKJV)

        When I read your post or really letter, you made me think of Wisdom! You are wise dear brother!

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