Criteria for System Integrity

The key to ongoing development of a fully functional and reliable system is limiting your options to those changes that improve its efficiency only, but within both the scope of its function and the service it provides while not straying beyond the limits of its original purpose.

Todd Beal

No system can exist without its purpose, and purpose cannot exist except by a first purpose prior to all systems, by which the first system, purposed as universal and thus the criteria for system integrity, makes possible all systems – even those that contradict it.

If this is not true, then I ask; what is the function of a purposeless system? According to what plan does that system work, and what service does it provide? How does it begin? Upon what nucleus does it grow, and toward what end? What are its limits, and who or what placed them? What governs it – for no system is self-maintaining?

A system is the synchronous interaction of multiple components, which, altogether, form a collective whole and operate toward one unified purpose. The weakest point of any system is therefore a single component operating against the purpose of the whole. By purpose alone a system begins, without which nothing exists or can.

Summarily then, a system is both purposed and then designed according to function and operational efficiency. Thereby a system is not accidental; and upon violation of its purpose, hence also design, no system can stand for long, including you and me.

Advertisements

About Todd Beal

I love truth and its facts. I love thought-provoking conversations that give both the other person and me a better understanding of a particular topic. I love to find answers to life-long questions; answers that let me see things for what they are instead of what they seem to be. I truly enjoy being in the midst of a group of people where all individuals are joining in, where everybody is enjoying the company of each other. I relax in the company of individuals who are competent yet humble. I like to catch myself doing or saying something ridiculous and then laugh my head off. I enjoy my church and being involved.
This entry was posted in By Title [C], Systems and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Criteria for System Integrity

  1. Lance Ponder says:

    Overall, brilliantly done. It seems to me that a purpose may exist without being known either to the system or to a system’s user. It also seems to me that there exists “anti-purpose” systems. You alluded to this by mentioning contradictions. The craftsman and the repairman each have purpose as well as provide or maintain purpose. God is both. He crafted us, and when we failed he became our repairman. While we may question our purpose, He knows it and provides and maintains it in us whether we know it or not.

    Like

    • Todd Beal says:

      Lance,

      | It seems to me that a purpose may exist without being known either to the system or to a system’s user. It also seems to me that there exists “anti-purpose” systems. |

      Yes, true.

      Whether a system’s purpose is known or unknown, if that purpose, upon which and by which the system was built, is violated, then the system and/or the contradicting violation begins to self-destruct. Secondly, anti-purpose systems are still built on purpose, and therefore their survival and ongoing development depends on the same system rules applicable to those systems not built on anti-purpose.

      My assertion in this post is twofold: (1) a system cannot remain in existence, let alone begin to exist, without purpose – which necessitates an intelligent being to first provide purpose, and therefore negates the very “chance” basis for evolution; (2) even if a system does maintain its purpose, both in operation and ongoing development, if that purpose violates the purpose and conceptual structure of the universal system, as established at the outset of Creation, that system is doomed to fail from the start because it consists of inherent contradictions. The universal system is the very framework (natural law) within which and by which all things operate, and the degree to which a nested system (constructed by the created, not the Creator) does or does not operate according to the laws inherent to the universal system, determines the health and longevity of that nested system.

      I didn’t know whether anyone would read this post or not. My abstract concepts aren’t too popular with most people. Thanks for giving it an honest read. Overall, I try to make my posts as public-accessible as possible without sacrificing substance, but once in a while I have to satisfy my own desire to write in the way my mind feels most comfortable – very abstract. Thanks, Lance.

      | The craftsman and the repairman each have purpose as well as provide or maintain purpose. God is both. He crafted us, and when we failed he became our repairman. While we may question our purpose, He knows it and provides and maintains it in us whether we know it or not. |

      That’s really cool.

      Like

  2. Lance Ponder says:

    One of the great and terrible things about abstract thought is that its outward expression is subject to interpretation. If the thought is withheld – kept to one’s self – then of what value is it? If the thought is manifest and misinterpreted, of what value is it? I think Solomon would have had a field day with that one. LOL.

    btw… I happen to agree with your principle assertions. The order and complexity of life and the natural universe at large cries out its praise to our Creator. Is it any wonder Jesus said if the crowd did not praise him the very rocks would? They already do!

    Like

  3. I love the beauty and symmetry of this post. It’s logical, makes sense, and rings true. I think of the human body and its intricate and seemingly perfect operation – yet it is subject to inefficiencies, frictions and degradations that eventually bring it to a state of death.

    Your comment about God being craftsman and repairman is enlightening, too. Resurrection and eternal life are not just pipe dreams created by human wishful thinking. They are realities forged by One who overcame both physical and spiritual death not just for himself, but for all who accept his gift of the same for them. In my view, that’s the driving purpose behind the continued expansion of the universe, instead of the slow atrophy and destruction you would expect to see in a flawed or random system of such size and scope.

    Like

    • Todd Beal says:

      Michael,

      | I think of the human body and its intricate and seemingly perfect operation – yet it is subject to inefficiencies, frictions and degradations that eventually bring it to a state of death. |

      That very thought was running through my mind while writing this post. I feel sorry for someone who is not well versed in the Bible because without it, a lot of needlessly unanswered questions remain. Such as, if God created everything, and if God is perfect and therefore makes no junk, why does my body wear out? Well, the answer to that lies in Genesis. We were perfect at the outset of Creation, perfect in every way. But, we lost that perfection because we violated God’s purpose for our design. Ever since then, even though our body system to one degree or another still does runs like clockwork, it has lost its full-on regenerative power source, God; which means we wear out because our bodies increasingly lose their ability to self-repair. This also means that due to our disrepair, mistakes in the genetic code are passed on from generation to generation. I know that you probably know this stuff; I just got to thinking out loud on paper (screen).

      I think of us now as a perfectly designed system that exists in a crippled state, due to a violation of its originating purpose.

      I tell ya’ Michael, the awesome news is that the New Testament tells us we each will someday receive a new indestructible body, just like Christ’s resurrected body as he appeared to the apostles before ascending into heaven (if, and only if, Jesus lives within our heart – that’s the only criteria). He ate food and drank beverages just as we do but could still appear and disappear, and walk through walls. Man, that will be cool!

      | Resurrection and eternal life are not just pipe dreams created by human wishful thinking. They are realities forged by One who overcame both physical and spiritual death not just for himself, but for all who accept his gift of the same for them. In my view, that’s the driving purpose behind the continued expansion of the universe, instead of the slow atrophy and destruction you would expect to see in a flawed or random system of such size and scope. |

      That’s very interesting. Something tells me that before we fell to our corrupted state, the universe was very, very different than today. Consider Romans 8:18-23 [NASB]: [18] For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us. [19] For the anxious longing of the creation waits eagerly for the revealing of the sons of God. [20] For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of Him who subjected it, in hope [21] that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. [22] For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now. [23] And not only this, but also we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body.

      This passage seems to indicate that not just humans, animals, plants, etc, suffer from the fall, but everything does. The fact that science now tells us our Sun will definitely burn out at some point in the future, tells me that the heavens are fallen also. Isaiah 65:17 [NASB] says, “For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth; and the former things will not be remembered or come to mind.” In my thinking, God would not create new heavens and a new earth if was still working perfectly. However, maybe I am missing your point. Are you possibly saying that even though all Creation is fallen, Christ continually repairs it so that it can at least continually operate? If this is what you meant then I would have to say, yeah, that is very awesome indeed to contemplate. What a feat to continually repair something of that magnitude.

      Thanks for giving me the chance to pour out my thoughts, Michael.

      Like

      • Todd, I was just thinking that although death and destruction are always evident, growth and renewal seem to be keeping pace in nature. The carcass of a single large animal can nourish and sustain ecosystems of scavengers and insects, and turn the grass greener and thicker for several feet around it for years. So although the “fallen” world constantly reminds us of our mortality, the economy of the life-death cycle also reminds us of God’s mercy and wisdom.

        I think the commandments of God are given to protect us from “earthstains” and teach us how to live at a level ABOVE that of the natural world, so that we will better be able to abide His presence when we are resurrected. The perfection of our spirits (available through Christ) needs to match the perfection of our bodies (a gift from Christ) in order for our “system” to endure the higher conditions in His kingdom. There will be another place prepared for those who failed to perform preventive maintenance and timely spiritual repairs through the Master Mechanic. Their feelings of unworthiness will terrify and ashame them at the prospect of living in God’s presence.

        Like

  4. Shafali says:

    I agree with you. No system can exist without a purpose (because it was designed with a purpose.) The question is – whose purpose? The designer’s? The person who wanted it designed? The user?

    When you spoke about systems, the system that I thought about was the governmental system of a nation steeped in corruption. The systems are designed with a purpose – the purpose to make money for those who put the system in place. The people for whom the system was purportedly made, namely the public, don’t get much out of it – yet, they get some value that is just enough for preventing the public to go anti-governmental. So, can we say that this system was designed as a multi-purpose system, with many embedded goals, and many “goal-owners”?
    Great post – glad you wrote it. Even a caricaturist likes to do some serious thinking…once in a while:)

    Warm Regards,
    Shafali

    Like

    • Todd Beal says:

      Shafali,

      Whose Purpose The system purpose would be the root purpose by which it was conceived. Of course that purpose may certainly incorporate the end user, or any other who is involved, but aside from the purpose originator, all subsequent system “purposers” – the designer, the person who wanted it designed (if not one and the same as the designer), and user – must do so in harmony with, as in not contradictory to, the original purpose. Otherwise, conflict of interest introduces contradiction to the system, causing the entire system to suffer.

      System of US Government I am not nearly as educated on US Government as Lance Ponder is (the gentleman who first commented on this post). He has participated in some pretty interesting conversations on his site, Divine Logos. However, I will give your statement a go, at least a little. I would have to say that the Constitution and the Bill of Rights is our purpose. I would also have to say that the reasoning behind the Pilgrims’ and Puritans’ emigration from England to the US would also be a part of that purpose; and if one were to see how that reasoning parallels the essence of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, it would immediately become apparent that we lost our purpose almost from the get go.

      Number one, we were founded as a nation under God, literally. But as time wore on, the principles that were established by our founding fathers such as George Washington gradually began to disappear. Shafali, I recommend the following article that addresses the religious persuasion of George Washington: article. It has numerous letters of correspondence between Washington, churches, individuals, ranking officers, members of congress, etc.

      I sure appreciate you plowing through this post. As I mentioned to Lance, I rarely get the opportunity to talk about these more abstract topics. Thanks a lot.

      Like

  5. gurusatap says:

    wah. mantap…
    i’m very pleased..

    Like

    • Todd Beal says:

      gurusatap,

      Thanks for your confirmation of this post. Once I realized that your native language is Indonesian, I used the Microsoft Explorer Live Translator to read “mantap” as “steady” in English. I take this to mean “solid” or “well-structured” in this context, or something equivalent.

      Thanks again for reading.

      Todd

      Like

      • gurusatap says:

        yes, I so agree and glad to read your writing. I agree, that the system is a unitary element or unsur (Indonesian for element) of a set of interrelated and influence each other in doing activities together to achieve certain goals. It must be implemented together, can not be separated from one another.

        Thank you.

        Like

        • Todd Beal says:

          Yes, and if these interrelated elements stop working together according to the originating system purpose, the system begins to break down.

          Like

Comments are closed.