Made In the Image of God

Do I study myself and yet still reject God? Do I accept he is real and yet reject my design, and his? How do I discover his structure: and dare I compare his to mine? Am I made in his image, truly? But what right do I have to see him in me – me!

Todd Beal

It is interesting that, while we know we are made in God’s image, we don’t fully realize what that means. Each one of us consists of a mind, a heart, and a spirit, with each operating distinctly yet inseparably unified (ideally) together as one being. This is why we can consciously feel, address, and operate from, our mind, heart, and spirit, distinctly yet simultaneously as one you/me, the person.

God also consists of a mind, a heart, and a spirit, with each operating distinctly yet inseparably unified together as one being. It just so happens that Jesus also has a physical body, but one that is transformed and spiritually perfected, to which, and within which, we the spiritual Church body – the bride of Christ – will someday be reconciled in Holy eternal marriage, the eternal unification of God and man. We each are, in every way, personally made in, and then – by personally accepting Jesus Christ into our spiritual heart – spiritually reborn in the literal image of God; God the Father (the mind, or executive center), God the Son (the image, word, and heart of God), and God the Holy Spirit (the essence of, animation of, outpouring of, and unification of, God) – three distinct personages in one omnipresent, all-knowing, all-powerful, eternally divine triune being, apart from whom none other exists nor can, and within whom all who love him exist in his life-giving presence forever).

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About Todd Beal

I love truth and its facts. I love thought-provoking conversations that give both the other person and me a better understanding of a particular topic. I love to find answers to life-long questions; answers that let me see things for what they are instead of what they seem to be. I truly enjoy being in the midst of a group of people where all individuals are joining in, where everybody is enjoying the company of each other. I relax in the company of individuals who are competent yet humble. I like to catch myself doing or saying something ridiculous and then laugh my head off. I enjoy my church and being involved.
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7 Responses to Made In the Image of God

  1. Great analogy for how we are all reflected in the Godhead. It’s always been fascinating to me, and one of the greatest evidences for the one true God, that the ethical monotheism of the Jews was so radically different from other religious constructs of the time. The Romans, Greeks, Mayans and Egyptians humanized their gods and gave them the same flaws and passions they had. The Hebrew god certainly isn’t passionless, but his anger is infallible and justified by the wickedness of his children. Their concept of holiness put God high above them in righteousness, but also recognized His condescension in actually caring about and interacting with his created beings. In Christ this concept reached its highest point with a being who was not only perfect but required perfection from his followers (Matt. 5:48). Of course, perfection is utterly impossible without the acceptance of Christ’s sacrifice and obedience to his commandments. But the very fact that we have the POTENTIAL to be “joint-heirs with Christ” is to me overwhelming evidence of a loving God who offers everything he has. Yes, I do believe that God and Christ have a face and the same number of fingers and toes that I do, but the more important “image” we are created in is the spiritual image of a divine nature — limitless potential that we hardly begin to access.

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    • Todd Beal says:

      Michael,

      | The Romans, Greeks, Mayans and Egyptians humanized their gods and gave them the same flaws and passions they had. The Hebrew god certainly isn’t passionless, but his anger is infallible and justified by the wickedness of his children. Their concept of holiness put God high above them in righteousness, but also recognized His condescension in actually caring about and interacting with his created beings. |

      Man, what a great statement. This is so true, and impossible to argue otherwise if one sincerely studies both mythology and the Bible. The interesting part about your comment is that you show God’s judgment side, his wrathful side, but also point out that his anger is only aroused when one violates his righteous and holy statutes. The “gods” of mythology acted on their anger indiscriminately and unjustifiably – to reiterate what you said. Mythology never speaks of a just God, one who is so pure, so holy, so righteous, and so loving, that he cannot possibly tolerate sin. For the simple fact that humans do not naturally think in terms of the Biblical God and his just and pure non-human ways, tells me, once again, that no human could ever make up such a God, much less consistently do it over and over using the same unchanging message for thousands of years, i.e. the Bible. That is truth.

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  2. Indeed Augustine thought that the explanation of the Holy Spirit as the mutal love of the Father and the Son helped to create the reality of the psychological idea of the Trinity itself. And here man or humanity is involved. We love because He first loved us! And God is love. So man is also trinitarian! See Augustine also on the will, the human will of man.

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  3. Lance Ponder says:

    The notion of being created in God’s image has a variety of meanings, mostly depending on who is speaking at the time. LOL. I appreciate very much what you have to say about this, though. Thanks for making me think on this today. God bless you.

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